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Martha Living Faux Finishes Showing Up In Stores

Martha Living Faux Finishes are the newest addition to her line of products offered through The Home Depot.

Included in the mix are Precious Metals, Potter's Clay, and Faux Finishing Glaze.

 

MLFaux.JPG  VIDEO

 

Precious Metals use silver and gold bases to create metal look-a-like finishes. They can be applied smooth using an ultra-smooth foam roller or a 3/8th nap fiber roller. They can also be used to create the "hammered" look using textured rollers (like the RL Metallic Roller). This product can be used by itself or combined with Faux Glaze to create other effects. Here is one example.

 

Potter's Clay is a top coat used over a base color (recommended on the back of the color card) to create a slightly textured effect on the wall. The texture is made from recycled paper added to the base, so this product is not recommended for use in bathrooms, kitchens, or other areas where it will be exposed to moisture. Texture is added to Potter's Clay using random "X" marks with a brush after rolling a four foot by four foot square over the based color.

 

ML Faux Glaze, like Behr's Faux Glaze, is mixed with your choice of paint colors (or other finishes) at a rate of four parts glaze to one part top coat. This is commonly applied over a base color using a sponge, rag, or brush to create a visual effect that combines a very slight texture with two or more colors. Though around for many years, faux finishes gained prominence in the paint industry as an alternative to wall paper (which is still available on Home Depot's Internet site but not in most stores). Here is a video describing application techniques.

 

As you might expect, we will begin exploring applications for Martha's new products and will share them here on the Community.

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Posted 2011-01-27T16:06:34+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL Pat_HD_ATL

 I just purchase the new precious metal gold, but I want to add two more precious metal color for a faux effect mix. Is this possible and how? Please explain in detail !!!! Can I purchase less than 1 gallon for this small wall, how many coats do I need ? The sale people did not know,the finish just arrival on the shelves in Chicago. No written data sheets available.

Posted 2011-01-30T03:15:40+0000  by oghen

Hello Oghen!

 

I'm excited to help you with this new product.

 

I've made this video for you to answer your question and show you a few traditional and non-traditional faux tools.

 

Have a look.

 

 

So, the answer to your question is YES, you can apply multiple colors.

 

The unique part of this application is that you must wait 24-hours between coats ... regardless of whether you are fauxing or just painting a flat coat on top of another.

 

This is a unique instruction relative to every other product we sell, so be certain to follow this guideline to ensure proper results.

 

In addition, the coverage is 200 square feet per gallon, so you might get one quart to cover a small wall (50 sq ft), but on most jobs a gallon will be required.

 

Finally, I want to suggest that you consider either Frog Tape or 3M Blue Tape w/Edge-Lock. They will give you a perfect line and can be left on the wall throughout the steps this project requires.

 

Follow up and post a photo of your creation!

Posted 2011-02-01T18:58:50+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

I saw the Potter's Clay today and brought home some sample sheets.  The Sesame is a little to yellow for my foyer.  Could I use a different base coat color like the Hickory msl202?

 

Where can I find detailed instructions on how to apply the potter's clay?

 

Thanks

 

 

Posted 2011-02-13T23:42:48+0000  by jeburkezoo

Hello jeburkezoo,

 

Martha's Potter's Clay, like her metallic, is a unique product in our offering.

 

On the back of her color cards, she has the base color as well as the name of the Potter's Clay color.

 

She recommends that you tape your trim, windows and doors first. Your base color is then painted in an Eggshell finish using a premium quality 3/8th or 1/2 inch nap roller. Allow to dry"overnight" before beginning with the Potter's Clay topcoat.

 

The topcoat is applied with either a 3 or 4 inch premium quality brush. Beginning at the top left corner of the wall, you will make crisscrossing X marks on the wall. You will crisscross the entire wall with Xs, reloading the brush as needed. Move down and out in a fan pattern to keep a wet edge and make a random pattern.

 

A lighter coat will make minimal texture and a heavy coat will make a more defined pattern. Remove the tape after the topcoat has dried at least four hours. Run a utility knife along the edge where the paint and tape meet to prevent pulling off dried paint.

 

I have tried to answer your second question with the detailed instruction above.

 

The answer to your first question is yes.

 

Like all faux finishes, you can experiment with different based colors to create color combinations that will work in your home or office. I strongly encourage you to purchase ML samples of several base colors and produce test boards that you can display at home. This is the best way to "see" the color in your lighting, with your accessories.

 

So whether you make your pattern tight and defined or loose and random, I predict you're going to love it!!!

 

NOTE: The texture in Potter's Clay is made from recycled paper. Do not use this product in high moisture areas.

Posted 2011-02-15T19:34:58+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

We are painting a dining room using Martha Living Precious Metals paint, color is Froth.  We have applied it as directed on the can, in 20" x 20" squares to create a column on the wall, then using floor to ceiling strokes to finish.  We're using the small textured rollers to apply.  Problem is that where the columns meet we are seeing a striping efftect.  A second coat helped but the stripes were still evident.  We're now putting on a third coat of this paint trying to eliminate the stripes.  Very frustrating. 

Can you offer any advice to remedy this?

Posted 2011-02-20T13:35:36+0000  by pam2011

Hello Pam2011,

 

What you are experiencing is very common with faux finishes ... the edge dries before you can apply paint to the next column and becomes a visible transition. This also happens when painters "cut in" the top of the wall or the doors and windows, allow the "cut in" to dry, and then paint the walls.

 

ProPainters call this edge a "High Hat."

 

Prevent creating a "High Hat" by "working to a wet edge." You do this by quickly applying paint in the next column before the edge of the prior column dries ... typically the overlap is about 1/2 inch and is applied immediately after the prior column is complete ... allowing the wet edge of the prior column to blend into the edge of the new column.

 

Plan your project timeline to prevent stopping or taking a break in the middle of the wall. Look for a stopping point exactly in the corner.

 

Finally, I love your idea of using the textured roller to create a metal look on the wall. Each additional coat (applied after the prior coat has dried 24-hours) will help cover the seam.

 

You might consider creating even more texture; if your store still has the old RL Regent Metallic roller, purchase one and try it on a sample board before completing your final coat. It has a "shag rug" nap that extends and pulls at the paint as you roll over the surface. The effect is a metal grain that should help cover the imperfections.

Posted 2011-02-24T13:50:50+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

Is  this paint washable?  Thank you.

Posted 2011-04-06T20:19:56+0000  by juldavwen

Good Day Juldavwen!

 

This thread covers two products: Precious Metal and Potter's Clay.

 

The second of the two, Potter's Clay, is not intended to be washed because it is made with recycled paper. According to the product representative, this product is not recommended for application in moist environments like a bathroom or a kitchen. Should you need to remove a spot, be cautious to prevent over-application of water ... dabbing with a lint-free rag which is wrung almost dry would be your best bet.

 

Precious Metal, on the other hand, has a sheen similar to satin ... which in most wall paints is considered washable. Wash this surface using a terry towel with a mild, non-abrasive detergent, then rinse with a terry towel dipped into fresh water and wrung almost dry.

Posted 2011-04-07T12:21:35+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

My painter is having a problem with roller marks, he is using the precious metals tin color. How can he get the marks out? He is keeping his roller wet and trying not to go back into the wet when he rolls. He has applied a second coat and still has marks. However this paint is being applied on a large accent wall in a family room. The wall is above a fireplace so it is maybe 14' high.

Posted 2011-04-17T21:42:10+0000  by bom75

WOW Bom!

 

A 14-foot accent wall ... what a focal point!

 

I have had much better results using the dense foam roller to create a smooth, seamless finish with this product.

 

The longer the roller nap, the more texture you will create. A standard 3/8ths nap will commonly show some texture.

 

Your project is also a bit more complicated because of the height of the wall.

 

Earlier in the thread, Pam asked a similar question.

 

In her case, she wanted to eliminate the seams between columns. We also discussed using longer nap to create texture.

 

Your application technique will be almost identical. But your application tool will be almost exactly opposite.

 

You should use the smoothest roller we sell; dense foam.

 

Here is a description of the application technique (and the discussion of how to create more texture):

 

What you (Pam) are experiencing is very common with faux finishes ... the edge dries before you can apply paint to the next column and becomes a visible transition. This also happens when painters "cut in" the top of the wall or the doors and windows, allow the "cut in" to dry, and then paint the walls.

 

ProPainters call this edge a "High Hat."

 

Prevent creating a "High Hat" by "working to a wet edge." You do this by quickly applying paint in the next column before the edge of the prior column dries ... typically the overlap is about 1/2 inch and is applied immediately after the prior column is complete ... allowing the wet edge of the prior column to blend into the edge of the new column.

 

Plan your project timeline to prevent stopping or taking a break in the middle of the wall. Look for a stopping point exactly in the corner.

 

Finally, I love your (Pam's) idea of using the textured roller to create a metal look on the wall. Each additional coat (applied after the prior coat has dried 24-hours) will help cover the seam.

 

You might consider creating even more texture; if your store still has the RL Regent Metallic roller, purchase one and try it on a sample board before completing your final coat. It has a "shag rug" nap that extends and pulls at the paint as you roll over the surface. The effect is a pronounced metal grain that should help cover the imperfections.

Posted 2011-04-26T17:55:38+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL
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