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Water Heater Concern

<div><a class="irc_mil i3597" target="_blank" href="http://gardenclub.homedepot.com/train-cucumbers-grow/" style="color: rgb(102, 0, 153); text-decoration: none; font-family: Roboto, arial, sans-serif; font-size: small; font-style: normal; text-align: center; background-color: rgb(34, 34, 34);"><img class="irc_mi" src="http://gardenclub.homedepot.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Train-Your-Cucumbers-to-Grow-Up-Hero.jpg" alt="Related image" width="580" height="330" style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"></img></a><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #7F7F7F;">What is a tendril?</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #7F7F7F;"><br></span></p></div><div><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #7F7F7F;">Simply defined, a tendril is a thread like, spiraling, flexible growth that protrudes from the nodes of a vining plant. Tendrils help the plant connect and take hold of a structure to support vertical and horizontal growth of the plant, above the ground.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #7F7F7F;"><br></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #7F7F7F;">Grapes are a good example of a plant that depend on tendrils to climb and latch onto arbors and trellises, cucumbers are quick climbers using tendrils to attach to support systems, and anything they can grab  in the garden. It is amazing how much weight the tiny fibrous threads can hold up!</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #7F7F7F;"><br></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #7F7F7F;">Tendrils are always reaching to support the flowers, fruits and vegetables on their vines!</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #7F7F7F;"><br></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: #7F7F7F;">Get support right here, do you have a garden question, let us help!</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><font color="#7f7f7f" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 16px;">Maureen</span></font></p></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div>
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Posted 2015-05-11T21:04:12+0000  by Eranthius Eranthius
 
The rust and the leak could just be coincidental and there could be a leak at the bottom of the tank.  The only places an electric water heater can leak is at the T&P valve and at the heating elements.  You could turn off the power and pull off each of the blue covers and see if there's any moisture.

As I said, if the heater is more than 6 years old, I would plan on replacing it.  If you didn't buy the water heater, the manufacturer's tag should tell you when it was manufactured.  If it doesn't actually list a date, it's usually part of the serial number. 

You'll want to check the fine print of your homeowners warranty to see if they cover replacement.

Best Answer

Posted 2015-05-12T10:06:48+0000  by Adam444
I see what looks like rust running down from the T&P valve (it serves as a safety release should the temperature or pressure get too high inside the tank) so it is possible that you have a leak there.  The valve may be hot, so use caution.  Is there any moisture around the valve or in the end of the piece of copper pipe that goes toward the floor?

How old is the water heater?  More than the six year warranty?  If so, start thinking about replacing it rather than making any repairs.


Posted 2015-05-11T23:00:14+0000  by Adam444
Thanks for the reply Adam!  I can see the rust too, but didn't feel any moisture in that area.  I have a home warranty, should I call and have them come take a look?
Posted 2015-05-12T00:21:42+0000  by Eranthius
 
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