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replace a small window with a larger one

Dining room.jpgI have a window in our dinning room that is about 68 inches wide and 25 inches tall.  It sits 14 down from the ceiling so the bottom of the window is 85 inches from the floor.  I have purchased a replacement window that is one inch less wide and 68 inches tall.  What is the best way to go about replaceing the window and enlargeing the space for the new one.  How do I finish the outside and inside?

Thanks for the help.

Here is the window size we are putting in to match the ones in the living room.  The new one is a single slider.

living room.JPG

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Posted 2012-03-18T21:15:10+0000  by parishollow parishollow
 

Hi hello and welcome to the community.

 

I can see why you would want to replace that window. That little window it’s not helping at all. It is light out and you had your light on while you were taking this picture- that tells me everything.

 

You asked what would be the best way to go about replacement…

 

Well the best way to go about go about replacement would be to re use the existing siding and to properly support the new larger opening. You haven’t specified what’s on the exterior of your home but I’m assuming it is siding by the way existing window is installed.

 

But first and foremost before you start anything, I would check if there are any obstacles for the new window to go in place.

 

Are there any mechanicals (electrical, plumbing, gas) routed bellow the existing window?

What’s on the outside of the window? Are there any exhaust vents near by, electrical, gas meter etc….

 

Also by enlarging existing opening you are weakening the wall and adding an additional shear stress on the wall in general.

 

This said I would advise to consult your local building department for the appropriate header size and diagonal bracing requirements. Header is the horizontal support that spans across top of the window bearing roof load and diagonal bracing is the bracing used on corners of the walls. It is not uncommon for the old houses not to have exterior sheathing.

 

This is how typical window framing looks like;

window framing.JPG

Hopefully when you purchased the new window, you purchased the one with the nailing fin. Nailing fin makes flashing  and installation of the new window much easier and better. Replacement windows are only designed to go in to the already preexisting opening with window frame. It is very difficult to properly flash replacement window in the open stud installation.

 

This is how nailing fin looks like;

nailing fin2.JPG

Note that in order to properly flash the new window siding needs to be removed around the perimeter of the window. For you reference I’ve also attached complete installation instructions for vinyl window with integrated nailing fin.

 

To view installation instructions click HERE or on one of the attached pictures.

 

Hope this helps.

 

George

 

 

 

Posted 2012-03-19T20:14:15+0000  by George_HD_CHI

Thanks for the help George.  I am going to take off the inside wallboard tomorrow evening to see what is in the wall as far as electrical.  I think there will be nothing.

 

Wouldn't there already be a header for the existing window?  Should I take the wall board off all the way to the ceiling?

 

The exterior of the house has those large hard tiles, asbestos?  I'll take a photo of it when I get home.

Posted 2012-03-21T14:14:47+0000  by parishollow

 

Parishollow,

 

In many jurisdictions, that room would not legally qualify as a bedroom due to the high windows being difficult to exit from during a fire.

 

The simplest retro- fit would be to keep the existing window width and lower the sill to the desired height. I personally would not go too low, as it then limits the furniture arrangement. A desk or headboard of a bed would  look odd against a patio door sized opening. Vinyl windows can be made to custom dimensions without paying an exhorbitant premium. The custom fitting greatly reduces your neccessary carpentry alterrations. Also, do opt for the Low-E Glass option. Low-E dramatically reduces heat loss and gain.  Even in a cold climate, your back would not sense the radiant cold if your desk chair remains in the same location. In a hot climate, the sun shining on your back will only give a fraction of the heat sensation.

Posted 2012-03-22T04:18:08+0000  by ordjen

Here is photo of the existing window from the outside and a picture of the corner of the window I bought to replace it.  The new window is one inch narrower and as tall as the others in the living room.  Note that the pictures are rotated 90 degrees, not sure why my phone does that.outside.JPGoutside.JPG

Posted 2012-03-22T14:44:22+0000  by parishollow

parishollow wrote:

Thanks for the help George.  I am going to take off the inside wallboard tomorrow evening to see what is in the wall as far as electrical.  I think there will be nothing.

 

Wouldn't there already be a header for the existing window?  Should I take the wall board off all the way to the ceiling?

 

The exterior of the house has those large hard tiles, asbestos?  I'll take a photo of it when I get home.


 

Hey parishhollow you are welcome.

 

Thank you for the pictures and I’m sorry I didn’t get back to you right away. I was out of the office for the remaining part of the week.

 

Will you have a window header or not depends on the framing technique they went with back in the day. If your home is framed using conventional system (platform/stick construction) than you can expect to find a window header,on the other hand if your home is balloon framed (floors hang on to the walls) than I doubt you’ll find one. Balloon framing method was common until the late 1940’s.

 

At first no you don’t need to take drywall off all the way to the ceiling – you can tell if you have a header by the way underside of the top sill (header) looks like. If there is a header in place than you will see, typically, a sandwich of two boards with plywood flitch (filler) in between.

FLITCH.JPGIf you have a window header than replacement would be as simple as extending the jack studs, if you don’t have one ,than obviously you would have to remove drywall above the window and frame one.

 

The exterior of the house has those large hard tiles, asbestos?  I'll take a photo of it when I get home.

Yes that is cement siding bearing asbestos.

 

Cement asbestos siding on your home poses no health risk as long as it’s undisturbed.

Asbestos siding only poses a health risk when fibers are airborne, which in the case of cement asbestos siding only occurs if siding its sawed, drilled , or broken in to smaller friable pieces. Obviously your project would involve all of this.

 

This said my recommendation would be to hire certified abatement company to handle removal.

 

If for some reason you decide to handle removal yourself I would suggest contacting you local authorities first. Many areas do not allow the homeowner to remove or handle asbestos siding. Some states allow homeowners to handle removal of the asbestos siding but they are subject to building permit, inspections and all of the safety precautions and disposal regulations.

 

You haven’t specified your location but for example in Illinois (my state) as of right now asbestos-related regulations do not apply to privately owned homes and apartments with four or less units.

 

This is from the Illinois EPA site;

 

 EPA.JPG

removal.JPG

Once the siding is removed missing sections can be replaced with a fiber cement substitute. GAF makes an identical replacement for your (common) siding and it’s called " target="_self">Purity Wavy.

 

 

  " target="_blank">Purity.JPG

 

  " target="_self">weatherside.JPG

New sections can be painted to match existing siding.

 

George

Posted 2012-03-26T19:15:18+0000  by George_HD_CHI
 
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