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5 Benefits of Using Lacquer




Of all the clear finishes available today, few can compare with the beauty and ease of application as lacquer.


For any furniture, cabinets, or decorative indoor projects that involve wood, choosing a clear coat to protect and finalize is a must. 


Consider the following 5 points below when you are looking for a clear coat for your next wood project.


1.  Lacquer is Fast Drying



The beauty of using lacquer as the final top clear coat  is that it's ease of use for even first timers.

Most lacquers can dry to the touch in under an hour and can be re-coated in 2 
hours. Just be sure that the wood surface you are applying onto is clean and free of debris in room temperature without high humidity.


Since lacquer dries fast, you'll encounter a lot of its fumes once applied. Be sure to apply it in a well-ventilated work space so you can breath easy.


2. Lacquer Requires no Sanding between Coats



This doesn't mean that you still may need to prep sand the surface before applying the lacquer. But the good news is that you don't have to sand at all between all coats of lacquer. 

Unlike it's polyurethane counterparts, lacquer reactivates each coat of it underneath it, allowing a smooth, level finish...no matter if you are applying it numerous times.


3. Lacquer is Easy to Apply


Most lacquers available today can be brushed on. Depending on the type you use will dictate how it can be applied, so always refer to the can's instructions before application.

For brush-on types, opt for a natural bristle brush rated for oil stains for application over the wood surface. If you use spray type or have it ran through a sprayer, be sure to do thin successive coats. 


Any cleanup should be done with lacquer thinner, since lacquer is not water soluble. Since that is the case, be sure to wear chemical resistant gloves.
Klean-Strip 1 pt. Lacquer Thinner




4. Lacquer can be Easily Removed



One aspect that separates it from its other clear coat and paint counterparts is that you can take off lacquer relatively easy. 

As stated above, you can use lacquer thinner to cut and/or remove it from it surface. If you are certain the top clear coat is lacquer, you can first test a small inconspicuous area to ensure how it reacts.


Lacquer on rags or applicators you intend to throw away needs to be disposed of properly, as it can present a fire hazard. With that said, DO NOT store oily or lacquer-soaked rags in a waste area near a furnace, heater, or space where it can cause it to ignite.


5. Lacquer Works and Looks Great on Furniture and Cabinets



Once you applied lacquer and allowed it to dry properly, you can now sit back and enjoy the beauty of it.

Since it's great for so many wood surfaces, it's only fair to mention its limitations. For example, lacquer cannot be used on kitchen countertops, or wood flooring. Also, you can't use lacquer over existing painted or varnished surfaces, as it won't bond to it correctly and leave a very ugly surface.


So if you are looking for a clear coat for your next wood project, look no further than lacquer to give you great results.


Joseph
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Posted 2016-01-11T20:06:16+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL Joseph_HD_ATL
 

For small to medium size projects, I like to use aerosol cans of either lacquer or urethane.  The light viscosity of unpigmented lacquers and urethanes, make them spray extremely well, giving a finish that is hard to rival with a brush. For whatever reason, manufacturers also use better nozzles on the clear coat spray cans. They give an extremely fine, even spray pattern. Because the thickness of the film is less than that of a pigmented paint, the clear spray lacquers and urethanes cover a surprisingly large area.

A quick hint for spraying from any spray can: If the can is heated in HOT water straight from the hot water faucet, they will spray much better. Heating increases the pressure in the can, and reduces the viscosity of the lacquer or oil based contents.
Posted 2016-01-12T07:05:01+0000  by ordjen
 
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