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Any Advice on best carpet pad for sound reduction

I recently had a insulation company come to my co-op apt and blow in green fiber cellulose in the walls, ceiling and under my hardwood floor. Now im going to put down my carpet and pad. 

 

Wondering if anyone has had any luck with different types for sound reduction. I was looking at this one:

 

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-202561367/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=carpet%20pad&storeId=10051

 

When reading around on the internet, most sites say that the denser the material (like MLV and lead) the better the sound reduction and impact reduction. So i was thinking this pad is 20lb density so that is a lot more than the 6-8lb rebond. Also, anyone try the Nike one? Their site says its good for sound reduction too. 

 

This company sells a sound-reducing carpet pad with MLV in it and closed cell foam on the bottom but its really expensive:

 

http://www.soundisolationcompany.com/index.php/soundproof-floors/carpet-floors/performance-underlay

 

It's about $270 for a roll of 90 sq feet. 

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated

Thanks

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Posted 2012-03-23T00:24:09+0000  by JarettS JarettS

 

Hi,

I have an issue with wall noise. I can hear my TV, talking between my living room and bedroom. I had Quietrock @ $45 a sheet installed over the existing sheetrock and plaster wall. This did not stop the sound transfer, I have also used sheetrock over soundboard from HD on another bedroom wall, it seems to work better, but has not stopped sound through the wall. The house was built in 1968, concrete slab tile over, 2x4 wood studs, sheetrock with plaster over. I have been thinking of installing carpet pad on the wall to stop sound? Any advice?

Posted 2013-02-19T17:08:58+0000  by tigas

Advice...move...haha!

 

No seriously Quiet Rock is not supposed to be used over plaster, only drywall so you wasted money on that. 

 

If im understanding you correctly you have 4" studs on your wall so im assuming the space between the walls is about 5 or so inches so theres nothing you can do. 

 

I originally thought i could reduce the sound in my apt. I had blown in cellolose insulation blown in the walls ceiling and floor and it didnt do much. very disappointed. i also had a thick carpet pad and a thick carpet installed, still very disappointed. now im moving because i cant deal with it. 

 

what i learned in my extensive research into products and techniques and $6k down the drain is THERE IS NO WAY I REPEAT, NO WAY TO SOUND PROOF OR EVEN REDUCE SIGNIFIGANTLY WHEN YOU HAVE 5" BETWEEN THE WALLS, CEILING OR FLOOR. IT JUST DOESNT HAPPEN. DONT WASTE YOUR MONEY LIKE I DID. MOVE. 

 

 

Posted 2013-02-19T18:03:55+0000  by JarettS

With a single wall, it is very difficult to totally alleviate noise. The whole wall acts as a diaphram, passing the vibrations from one side to the other. The important thing is to have no solid surface through which sound can pass. A second free standing wall creates such a barrier, but at significant cost and reduction of room space.

 

Short of this, there are sound strips which ae mounted crosswise to the studding or rafters, which act to greatly minimalize contact between the walls. The strips have a cushion between them and the existing studding.The new drywall is then fastened to these strips. There is also high density sound insulation intended to be placed in the available dead space.

 

My first house was a townhome with a double, non-touching  2x4 wall with fiberglass insulation in the cavity. I could absolutely not hear my neighbors Oddly enough, I could go down the basement and carry on a converstion with him through the 6 inch concrete common wall!

Posted 2013-02-21T22:38:33+0000  by ordjen

JarrettS,

 

Hi, I was checking this question out on the web and stumbled on this post.  Hope you still are working for Home Depot to answer this.

 

My house is 100+ years old and I have the origininal wood floors upstairs.  These are wide planks with gaps between so the sound from the living room below comes straight through the floor.  I want to put down carpeting over the floor and am looking to soundproof as much as possible.

 

What padding would you suggest, if it is possible to do this?  The room is about 13 x 14.

 

Thanks for the help,

Robin

Posted 2014-01-13T11:17:45+0000  by ribbon53

Hello Robin,

 

Thanks for your question and welcome to the community!

 

I'm not sure where JarrettS is but I am a Home Depot associate who has worked in flooring for many years.

 

Before the carpet, the padding, is the real culprit of the noise of your floors...the hardwood planks themselves. Without addressing the existing noise of the planks, you are literally cover up the problems. So really at the heart of the issue is making sure the hardwood floor is as quiet as possible.

 

Usually the problem of hardwood floors making noise (I have them myself at my apartment) isn't the gaps in between, it's how well or poorly they are attached to the subfloor. If this is a hardwood floor that you have no problem with the carpet permanently going over, you can use coarse threaded screws at least a 1/2" thicker than the plank of the wood.

#8 x 2 in. Coarse Steel Bugle-Head Phillips Drywall Screws (1 lb.-Pack)

For example, if the plank is 3/4" thick, then you'd need at least 1.5" long screws to assist in fastening  the planks. Once the planks are secured by screws (nails can eventually pop up), then you can lay down the carpet or padding of your choice.

 

No carpet or pad on earth will be as effective as making sure that the foundation; your hardwood floors, are secured firmly to the subfloor.

 

With that said, you can still use a good pad and carpet. Make sure that the carpet you use is plush and has a high face weight. That equates to a much more plush feeling underfoot. The padding is just as important too; I typically prefer one with at least 6lb. weight.

 

You can click on the image of the carpet and pad below for additional information.

 

Carpet pad

 

Once you fasten the hardwood floors securely to the subfloor and use a good quality carpet/pad....you'll see a big difference in the sound downstairs.

 

Let me know if you have any additional questions,

Joseph

Posted 2014-01-15T20:53:02+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL
I would imagine the more density in the carpet padding the more sound deadening effect it will have. Also it would have a little to do with the subflooring underneath where the padding will go. https://ruggeek.com/carpet-repair/
Posted 2018-09-02T15:59:36+0000  by Ruggeek
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