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Best Light bulb for showing true paint color

I have painted my hallway a beige tone and the same paint was used in the den, which is open to the hallway.  The paint on the hallway wall just adjacent to the den has a pink hue to it while the den is true to color.  I think the light bulb in the hall light fixture is the problem.,  That fixture has a white glass globe on it.


What is the best light bulb to use to show the true color?

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Posted 2016-02-13T11:06:39+0000  by mcburnsGA mcburnsGA
 

Hey there mcburnsGA,


Thanks for joining us here on the community!



Lighting can be a tricky sort sometimes with paint colors, this even includes natural sunlight coming in through the doors and windows.


The biggest factor you'll need to see now is to see what type of light bulb you have now. Once you do that, you can decide on which new bulb to choose from.



Older incandescent/halogen and some newer energy-saving CFL and LED light bulbs are in a lower color temperature (aka Kelvins or K) and low CRI (Color Rendering Index), which can give off a yellowish-soft light.


In terms of Kelvin temperatures, the chart below best describes this.



While higher Kelvins can mean a cooler, sometimes brighter light, having a high CRI can mean true color rendering as well. But, having a higher Kelvin does NOT MEAN having a 'true' color of the paint show up once its illuminated.


No matter what the color temperature is, a high CRI number (on a scale from 0 being the worst view of seeing true color to 100 being the best) is the best surefire way to determine if a light bulb is showing the real color of the paint on your wall.


Unfortunately, a lot of light bulbs out there don't have their CRI listed. Almost all I've seen online will have it, and any light bulb with a CRI over 85 can and will show the true color of your paint.



Having a glass globe covering the bulb will diffuse the light, which can slightly lessen the amount of lumens, or actual light, coming through it. Changing it out to a clear version or just removing it can give you a little more light (lumens).


I hope you've also tried the lighting at night as well as having the lighting in adjacent rooms too. This can equally effect the color of your walls. If this seems like a lot of information, click here and it will take you to another page showing you a video of the actual differences in color temperatures.


In short, you can find a 2700K-5000K color temperature light bulb with a very high CRI number to give yourself the best lighting for the hallway. LED bulbs typically are the only I've seen in the stores and online that has a good price and good lighting.



A great example of this is below, and linked here. Notice the CRI rating on the packaging in the image below.



This or any bulb may solve your dilemma with your color, but this is one of those situations where only by you trying out this or a similar high CRI-rated light bulb will work for you.


And as I stated earlier, having the light bulb on at night can be a different situation, as natural sunlight isn't mixing in with the hallway fixture.


Let us know if you have any further questions,

Joseph

Posted 2016-02-13T16:40:11+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL

Hi mcburnsGA,


The way you see colors in your home depends upon whether you use yellow-red casting Soft White bulbs, full spectrum bulbs that are more like daylight and reproduce colors like you would see them in daylight, or a bulb which casts a color somewhere between the two.

 

Here is a simple chart that shows how different color casting light bulbs change the way your see your colors.

 

Color Temperature*SourceCastsChanges Color Perception
1850Sunrise or Sunsetred to violetmost
3000Cool or Soft White bulbyellow-redmore
4100Moonlightyellow somewhat
5000Horizon Daylightwhite-yellowless
6500Diffused Daylightpure daylightleast

 

*Color Temperature is measured in degrees Kelvin.

 

Most bulbs display color temperature on the package or use terms like "Cool White" or "Daylight" stamped on the bulb.

 

In Function: Photographers, Retailers, Architects, Designers, and Grocery Meat Departments have long used the color temperature of light to bring out the preferred color in their products.

 

The easiest example occurs in your local meat market where fresh cuts are displayed under approximately 2000 degree Kelvin bulbs that cast a red color on the meat ... making it appear fresh.

 

If you look at the lights over the table at your favorite restaurant, you'll notice they cast colors that make your food more visually appealing ... commonly soft-white light.

 

These practices are broadly used in business and industry and can just as easily be used in your home or office to ensure the colors you choose create the impact you intended.


YOUR ANSWER:

The most accurate reproduction of any color will occur under full-spectrum daylight ... 6500-degree Kelvin "Daylight" bulbs that recreate full-spectrum daylight in your home.


Hope this helps,


Pat InPaint

Posted 2016-02-16T23:39:05+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

As I stated earlier:


"While higher Kelvins can mean a cooler, sometimes brighter light, having a high CRI can mean true color rendering as well. But, having a higher Kelvin does NOT MEAN having a 'true' color of the paint show up once its illuminated.


No matter what the color temperature is, a high CRI number (on a scale from 0 being the worst view of seeing true color to 100 being the best) is the best surefire way to determine if a light bulb is showing the real color of the paint on your wall."



Having a daylight or blue/ full-spectrum light source does not guarantee a true color for paint or any true rendering of a color in your home.



ALWAYS check a CRI for the light bulb. I myself had to find this out via lighting technicians throughout the years working in the lighting department at various Home Depot stores. 



I mention this because there are various blue spectrum bulbs out there that have a low CRI, which in turn won't give you true color rendering. Ask any true lighting expert on the matter and they will concur.


Re review the post I've written originally below to see your options in getting the correct lighting.



Joseph


Posted 2016-02-22T21:06:31+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL
 
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