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Can you regrout grout???????

I have tile in my kitchen and two bathrooms and was wondering if you can regrout grout.  There are spaces where it could use some more grout and make it look more nice.  When it was originally done, they told myself and my husband that they do not seal grout just in case we need to replace a tile.

 

I am hoping that I will be able to regrout and then seal it myself.

 

Thanks HomeDepot you rock!!!!!!!

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Posted 2011-09-24T17:38:09+0000  by jax016 jax016
 

Hey hkr,

 

Thanks for joining us here on the community!

 

I did see the item you mentioned, and unfortunately we don't carry it in our stores or online.

 

While this product can work for loose tiles, it still won't solve the problem that has been this entire thread: loose or missing grout lines.

 

Nothing but plain and simple re-grouting and sawing out any old grout will solve this issue. However, you can use the item you mentioned for loose tiles instead of having to use mortar.

 

Please keep coming back to the community for more product knowledge and information, we love to hear what is out there!

 

Cheers,

Joseph

Posted 2013-11-20T14:27:32+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL

There is a product called Fix A Floor. You inject under loose/hollow tiles. I ordered two cartridges for a test and then ordered two cases. It works great. You can find them online and order. After securing your loose/hollow tiles you can regrout just those tiles.

Posted 2013-11-19T16:58:03+0000  by hkr

Hey SOFIAMERCER,

 

Thanks for your question and welcome to the community!

 

Any missing areas that are empty as you state should be re-filled with grout again. As for the loose tile, that will need to be taken up, have the mortar removed as much as possible, and re-installed. Mortar is a different material than grout, but we do carry a grout and adhesive that does double duty. Click below for more information.

Simplefix 1-qt. White Pre-Mixed Adhesive and Grout

The reason why there is 'air space' underneath the tiles is that the mortar was applied with a notched trowel. This method gives more adhesive the ability to spread out evenly, giving it a stronger bond.

 

You most likely will need to use a grout saw and remove any loose grout and some near the empty space of the grout. Once you do this, you can refill the area with grout using a grouting float.

 

You can then fix your loose tile by prying it up and using the same grout and adhesive above. We sell tile install kits that are very inexpensive, and they have both grout float and tile mortar applicator. Click below to view it and get more info on it.

 DIY Tile Repair and Tile Installation Kit

 

Wipe off any excessive grout/adhesive as soon as you see it. Afterwards, you may seal the grout and tile to ensure no moisture gets into and under them.

 

You may need to remove any additional tiles if you see that they are loose as well.....you don't want to keep re-grouting and re-adhering the tiles whenever a problem arises. You will also need to check to see if the subfloor is in good shape as well.

 

Let me know if you have any additional questions,

Joseph

Posted 2013-08-07T18:14:33+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL

I HAVE RE-GROUTED SEVERAL FLOOR TILES IN MY CONDO.  I HAVE FOLLOWED THE INSTRUCTIONS EXPLICABABLY...  (FOLLOWED ALL DIRECTIONS AND MIXING PROCEDURE)

AFTER SEVERAL WEEKS, HOWEVER, AN EMPTY SPACE 'RE-APPEARS' WITHIN THE TILES, CAUSING ME TO RE-GROUT AGAIN...

THERE IS ONE AREA IN THE KITCHEN, ALSO, THAT SEEMS TO HAVE A LOOSE TILE (ONLY BECAUSE THERE IS A 'CLICKING' SOUND WHEN STEPPED ON...

IN ADDITION, WHEN I TAKE AWAY THE THE OLD GROUT, THERE IS AN 'AIR SPACE' THAT SEEMS TO BE BELOW ALL THE TILES??  I ACTUALLY COULD JUST PUSH THE OLD GROUT THROUGH TO THE FLOOR BASE....

ANY SUGGESTIONS??  YES I AM USING THE SANDED GROUT FOR 1/8"....

Posted 2013-08-06T11:47:22+0000  by SOFIAMERCER

Just to clarify, I am entirely with you guys in making sure you get as much of the old grout out, the purpose of the post was to explain that older grout should be taken out. As stated in my original response above:

 

"When re-grouting your tiles, the key is to ascertain just how much (or little) grout you already have."

 

I should of explained in more detail to ensure the new grout is put in, that any of the old grout in bad shape should be removed. My purpose in that was to salvage what is good, and take out what is bad. If it seemed as though I was stating to cover any existing (older) grout, then I apologize, but that wasn't the intention.

 

In my older video entitled Grout Repair, you can see this process of taking out grout even further using a hand-held as well as an oscillating tool to get the job done.

 

I hope to see more of your responses on the community, and always feel free to give us your professional input here.

 

Cheers,

aboveaveragejoe

Posted 2012-09-08T14:45:03+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL
correct, you have to remove the old grout first. You cannot just grout over the old grout. It will crack right out
Posted 2012-09-06T22:16:38+0000  by RyobiTileGuy
I also work in Home Depot Flooring Dept. and have installed for 25 years, you might want to check with the manufacter as to being able to regrout grout. As far as I know you cannot regrout grout it will not adhere to the old grout as concrete will not adhere to concrete and last.Yyou need to atleast take out 2/3 of the old grout for the new grout to hold. Custom Building Supplies states no to regrouting grout.
Posted 2012-08-30T20:03:47+0000  by oldtimefloors

Hello again Anna!

 

I can tell you from working in the tile section of my Home Depot for a number of years that yes, you can regrout grout!

 

Grouting and sealing tile is one of the easiest and best ways to spruce up the look of your existing tile floors. When re-grouting your tiles, the key is to ascertain just how much (or little) grout you already have.

 

Before starting this project, be sure to get out and clean out any old or loose bits of grout, if you can see any. To effectively get rid of the old grout, I did a how-to video last year on just that subject, you can watch the video by clicking here!

 

Next, find the areas in the kitchen and/or your bathrooms and see the areas you like of the good areas of grout and mimic that. To get the grout looking the way you want it to look, refer to the steps and supplies below.....

regrouting.JPG

The key to making the grout look as good as the other areas in those rooms is to make it look as seamless as possible. Knowing what color of grout you had before will greatly assist you in this. Remember too that grout lines larger than 1/8" thick are usually sanded grouts and anything narrower than that are non-sanded. To view the colors of all grouts that The Home Depot carries in-stock and through special order, you can view them on an earlier post I did about choosing grout colors by clicking here

 

Let us know if you have any additional questions Anna! Thanks for coming back and posting another great question on the community here, we are always here to help.

 

aboveaveragejoe


Posted 2011-09-24T19:28:01+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL
 
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