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Bath & Faucets

Changing the metal shower trim color

I am updating a bathroom in preparation for selling my home.  I have brass trim on the top and around the door of the shower.  Is there an easy and inexpensive way to change the color to stainless or brushed nickel without replacing the whole shower surround?

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Posted 2011-01-27T00:18:04+0000  by lameier lameier
 

Actually I'm looking to go the opposite way. I really like polished brass. I'm trying to change my existing polished chrome to polished brass. Delta no longer makes my trim package in polished brass except in a very expensive conversion kit. Would aeresol metallic spray paint hold up? If not would a heavy duty clear coating help? Is there any way of doing this without having to go through the cost of new trim, new valves & having to hire a plumber? 

Posted 2013-12-25T07:32:06+0000  by edl

Actually I'm looking to go the oppossite way. I really like polished brass. I'm trying to change my existing polshed chrome to polished brass. Delta no longer makes my trim package in polished brass except in a very expensive conversion kit. Would Krylon metallic spray paint hold up? If not would a heavy duty clear coating help? Is there any way of doing this without having to go through the cost of new trim, new valves & having to hire a plumber? 

Posted 2013-12-25T07:29:01+0000  by edl

Hello Lameier,

 

Your request is one we hear at the Store regularly; from those moving out as well as from those moving in.

 

I'm glad you joined us here at the Community ... Welcome!

 

This project is all about using your "craft" skills and a few inexpensive products to make the change. 

 

The key to the project is the prep. You should consider yourself a "detailer" when undertaking this step ... be very careful not to damage the rubber seals which hold the shower glass into the metal frame.

 

Start with 400-grit wet sandpaper to cut the old finish and improve adhesion of the new finish without creating ridges or scuff marks that would show through the new finish. Keep a container of fresh, clean water on hand to regularly moisten the paper and make certain to buff the entire metal surface.

 

Then use as many towels as necessary to completely remove the sanding dust.

 

Next your will begin meticulously taping the edge. I use that descriptor because the detail you establish at this step will make the project look professional. I like Frog Tape or 3M Tape w/Edge-Lock to ensure a fine straight edge.

 

Once the transition between your old brass and the rubber seal has been cleanly defined with tape, attach plastic to the free edge of the tape to cover every surface (tile, tub, glass, flooring, counters, etc.) within ten feet of your working area. Do not spare either time or material on this step ... it is very important to prevent overspray from destroying other surfaces in the room.

 

Once you're satisfied that your prep will prevent secondary projects (from damage to unprotected surfaces) I am recommending you spray a primer designed for metal, your new color, and then a clear coat to protect the surface. Krylon is the most inexpensive product in our offering and they have all three products.

 

SatinNickel.jpgClrCoat.jpg

The Satin Nickel and Clear Coat shown here are two of the three products you will need. Use an off-white or light gray primer under the Satin Nickel as your base coat. And above all else, do not get in a hurry and try to cover the surface in one coat ... spray three light coats about an hour apart.

 

Oil-Rubbed Bronze is another product that does re-create the look commonly applied to faucets and light fixtures, so you might consider it as an alternative to the stainless. I did not show a stainless product because, in my experience, I haven't found one that really re-creates the unique look of stainless.

 

Since you will be working inside a contained area, be sure to ventilate the room throughout the project. And when complete, do not use aggressive cleaning pads or solvents on the new surface. A sponge, non-abrasive mild detergent, and a fresh water rinse should be sufficient to keep the surface clean.

 

Without a doubt, there are other methods like brushing similar products (if you can identify alternatives). But this project should match your description, "easy and inexpensive."

 

Finally, expect to give up the use of your shower for about three or four days to allow for prep, applications and for the new coatings to fully cure. Expect to spend between $35 and $50 on this project.

Posted 2011-01-27T14:22:21+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL
 
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