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Help! I've gotten a little too creative with a kitchen cabinet refinish using Preserva Wood

Help! I've gotten a little too creative with a kitchen cabinet refinish using Preserva Wood. They are the old 1960's style cabinets with an old oil based sealer. 

We stripped the sealer off, sanded, and put a straight up black tempera paint into the exposed wood. I thought I'd seal it with Preserva Wood (penetrating oil stain and sealer, usually used for outside) to ensure water resistance, because this had worked so well for me on my kitchen table that was just wood, it kept the unsightly water rings from happening every time I put down a glass of anything when I'd just used a wipe on poly.

 Now the major problem with this is that the Preserva Wood is breathable? Is that why it didn't seal in our water based stain? the wood seems protected, but the stain we created with tempera is washing off. I have read that a polyurethane is not compatible for layering over deck stains. Is this also true for Preserva Wood? I am needing to seal the color in. Can I use a clear wax? Need to know what product works. In pretty big trouble, this was done for a friend who paid me! I should have researched.
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Posted 2017-02-03T20:54:29+0000  by Meijsha Meijsha
 
I have to admit that I'm a bit at a loss to understand why you would use tempera paint and deck finish for an interior cabinet.  Why not traditional wood finishes?  I have no idea what Preseva Wood is but I might suspect it's mostly a modified oil mixed with some varnish and in that way it's very similar to other "oil" finishes like Watco's Danish Oil.  Frankly those kinds of finishes aren't really suitable for surfaces that are going to see a lot of use like kitchen cabinets.  While wax can impart a bit of luster to a surface, it provides little protection.

My suggestion might be to strip the piece again and start over using the correct products.  If you want a black cabinet, use black paint (oil or a waterborne alkyd).  If you want more of the grain of the wood to show through, use a black stain and/or dye followed by an appropriate topcoat.

If you plan on doing more wood refinishing (or finishing) projects it might be a good idea to do some reading on the subject.  Both Bob Flexner and Jeff Jewitt have excellent books on the subject.


Posted 2017-02-03T22:13:04+0000  by Adam444
 
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