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Help!!! Scratch on Bamboo floor

Hi,

 

I am needing some help. I have bamboo flooring. My lovely 1 year old lab mix who loves to run around my house has scratched my floors. Now, its not just one little area. It's the ENTIRE floor. Even with he's nails trimmed he still scratches the floor, but not as bad. The thing is, you can't see the scratch on first glance because its only the surface. You have to REALLY look at the floors to see it. When people come by they don't see it until I point it out but I know it's there. I have googled how to get rid of the scratches. Seems like everyone says to use wood filler and sand it down. Is that the best solution? How often can I do that? I read somewhere to do that once a year. Can I do that?

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Posted 2011-10-07T19:48:02+0000  by DIYbeginner DIYbeginner
 

Hi carmen521,

 

Thanks for your question and welcome to the community!

 

Since the Rejuvenate didn't work out for you, you'll more than likely need to follow the steps that are above in this thread that Blake and I wrote regarding fixing your floor.

 

Fortunately, you'll be working in a very small area compared to a large space. With that in mind, you can get the smallest amount of stain/polyurethane top coat for the job.

 

Just refer to the information above and you can remove the scratch effectively.

 

Hope this helps you out,

Joseph

Posted 2013-11-02T14:57:43+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL

I just installed bamboo floors in my kitchen, got the granite counter top installed yesterday,so we began the process of organizing the kitchen of my dreams, and voila, when we moved the frigde to its place, my brand new floor were scratched, pretty bad, I tried the rejuvenate and still showing...help...

Posted 2013-10-30T22:18:04+0000  by carmen521

Thanks for posting the pictures!

 

They gave me a much better idea of the condition of your floors, and yep it looks like doggie paws are the culprit here :smileyhappy:

 

 

You said you tried some to the Rejuvenate on some extra flooring, did you by chance experiment with a small area on the affected area of the floors? The product works only for floors that have the noticeable scratches as your floor is. If you did put it down on a scratched area, then your next step would be as Blake stated earlier on this thread:

 

"Just for clarification, a light screen sanding refers to sanding with screen sandpaper, which has advantages over regular sandpaper in that it is double sided and has crevices that can collect media from the surface being sanded which make them more effective at removing all different sorts of coating. We suggest a “light” sanding (high grit sandpaper 220+) because if you were going to reapply a brand new poly coat, you are only trying to remove the polyurethane layer which is a very thin coating on top of the hardwood. Too much sanding will start removing stained wood which is only necessary if you wanted to completely refinish your wood floors. Again, I don’t think you should need to do ANY of this given your situation, but I never miss an opportunity to pass along a little DIY know-how. =D"

 

So what does that all mean? Blake states that by using a screen sandpaper, you can get the exact results you want for your floor. But again, only do this if the Rejuvenate didn't work well for the floors.

 

Lightly sanding and refinishing your floors can be a day-long project, so be aware of the time and areas you will want to do. For example, I would save the entrance way or kitchen (high-traffic areas) for last, so you can concentrate on the larger rooms first.

 

Screen-sanding any floor can be achieved two ways, by using a pole sander or by a powered square buff sanding machine. With either option, remember that you are ONLY taking off the top layer(s) of polyurethane and not taking it down to the stain. As Blake suggested, use a high grit sandpaper to take off the finish. In the pictures below, here are some of the items that are used in this process....

floor sanding accessories..JPG

Notice how the sandpaper is not a screen and theres also a sanding sponge block as well in the pictures above.

 

Very fine grit sandpaper will not produce as much large dust particles as the heavier sandpapers do, so you won't have to worry about using screen sandpaper in this instance. However, it is up to you to use them or the standard paper type, just something to consider. You also saw the sanding sponge block and wondered what that was all about. Well, you use the sanding block on hard-to-reach areas or crevices that the pole sander just can't reach, but only doing it very very lightly. In fact, you may never even have to worry about this step since the scratches are all going to be in visible and accessible areas, again just another thing to remember. Whenever sanding, be sure to always clean up right away, dried polyurethane can still be activated (get sticky) from the heat due to friction of sanding it down. So by making sure you clean up with a tack cloth or microfiber mop afterwards will go a long way when you reapply the new coat of floor polyurethane down.

 

The other way to take that top layer of finish off your floor is the floor maintainer or square buff sanding machine. We rent them at your

 

These machines really save you time and effort on taking off the polyurethane from the floor. Use the same fine grit sandpaper (220 grit or higher, any lower can and will take up the stain) and clean up the dust just as you would doing it if you used a pole sander. Remember these are very effective machines, so the key to using these square buff sanders is not to go over an area too much, or you can go deeper than the polyurethane finish on the floor.

floor sander.JPG

 

 

No matter which way you want to approach this, always start with a small corner of the room. Experiment and familiarize yourself with the machine or pole sander. Closely inspect the area make sure that the sanding is done correctly, the floor should have a slight roughness or 'tooth' to it. The color, or stain on the wood floor should not have changed.  After getting the right technique you are most comfortable with, you can finish the entire room.

 

After you clean and get the dust particles off the floor, you are ready to apply a floor-rated polyurethane. We sell large sizes of floor-rated polyurethane to put down on all your rooms, so you don't have to worry about getting lots of gallon containers.

 

The best way to apply the finish is with a flat-shaped lambswool applicator. The natural fibers of the lambswool give the polyurethane a smooth, professional finish to your floors. And if you are using an oil-based polyurethane, this is important since these kinds of polyurethanes dry slower than their water-based counterparts, so refinishing a room at a time is important and something to consider. You also may need to re-coat your floors more than once, and it is recommended to very lightly sand between coats to allow the final top coat to stick properly. Without doing so, you can run into the top layer flaking or chipping off over time. The resanding is pretty much exactly the steps mentioned earlier to take the polyurethane off, just with not as much effort and with a lighter grit (220 or higher) of sandpaper.

 

Well there you have it, and so history doesn't repeat itself, I'm glad you got his nails trimmed, but you can also use a runner or covering to allow him to roam freely but not scratch your floors again.

 

Hope this helps you out,

aboveaveragejoe


 

 

 

Posted 2011-10-15T16:57:58+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL

DSCF2332.jpgDSCF2329.jpg

 

Ok so here is a sample of my floor. It is the kind that you click into place. Now imagine this but on most of my floor. I tried the rejuvenate professional wood floor restorer on some extra flooring that the previous owners left in my house. I didn't work so I went to home depot and showed them a sample of my floor with some similar scratches. They suggest that I sand it down. What do you think?

Posted 2011-10-14T21:20:27+0000  by DIYbeginner

Hi there DYIbeginner, I’m Blake from California. Joe is not in today but I would be happy to answer your question. I have helped plenty of people with their floor refinishing projects, and I do think that Joe is right on the money with his suggestion. I don’t think that sanding down your polyurethane top coat will be necessary, as the scratches at this point are mostly only surface deep. In several years time when the overall thickness of the polyurethane top coat has worn through you will want to sand down and refinish the whole floor.

 

If you are using a product like Rejuvenate, a sanding is not necessary as these types of refinishing products are designed to leave a much more thin film than a full strength flooring polyurethane. Rejuvenate works by filling in small scratches and leaving a very high gloss top coat on top of your otherwise good condition polyurethane. By far the most important part of a light restoring top coat project will be the pre-application cleaning. Like Joe recommended a very thorough cleaning with a hardwood floor cleaner is best. Just be sure that the floor is 100% dry before you start your restoration coating. Also, the longer you let it dry without contacting the surface, the less likely you are to damage that new coat. I usually like to double the manufacturer’s dry time so that I don’t have to do a project twice (remember to increase dry time if weather is cold or wet).

 

Just for clarification, a light screen sanding refers to sanding with screen sandpaper, which has advantages over regular sandpaper in that it is double sided and has crevices that can collect media from the surface being sanded which make them more effective at removing all different sorts of coating. We suggest a “light” sanding (high grit sandpaper 220+) because if you were going to reapply a brand new poly coat, you are only trying to remove the polyurethane layer which is a very thin coating on top of the hardwood. Too much sanding will start removing stained wood which is only necessary if you wanted to completely refinish your wood floors. Again, I don’t think you should need to do ANY of this given your situation, but I never miss an opportunity to pass along a little DIY know-how.     =D

 

I very much hope this helps DIYbeginner, good luck with your project! If you have any more questions please feel free to ask, we are here to help! I’d love to see a before / after picture too!

 

-Blake

Posted 2011-10-11T21:21:01+0000  by BlakeTheDiyGuy
Thanks so much. I thought I would have to replace them completely. I think im gonna just do them in the "high traffic" area like in from of my stairs. Here's my question. How do you "lightly screen sand"? I know you go with the grain of the floor but with what?
Posted 2011-10-11T16:15:50+0000  by DIYbeginner

Hello DIYbeginner!

 

Thanks for your flooring question!

 

I'd like to welcome you to the community and talk to you about ways to get your floor looking like the day you installed it.

 

In terms of the scratches as you have described, it sounds like they are fairly superficial to the surface. In that case, you can luckily skip the step of using wood filler. You only sand down floors to do a deep refinish only IF they are solid Bamboo planks or are engineered, if they click-locked together and had an underlayment down below them, then you would very lightly screen sand and place a polyurethane rated for floors on top. Doing a total refinish of your floors should only be done if the top coat of your floors is dramatically worn away. 

 

For yourself, I would start out with cleaning your floors like you usually do first, and then applying a floor restorer that has polyurethane or similar properties in it, to allow a updated coating over your floors. This involves no extra work except for simply applying it on!

 

There are many products on the market that can choose from that can give the luster back for your floors without sanding or refinishing. There are 2 that The Home Depot sells, one by Rejuvenate and the other by Bona and both work pretty much the same.

 

They can both be applied with a microfiber mop and dry in no time at all. The Rejuvenate product can cover about 300 square feet, but remember, these are light finishes and won't last as long as refinishing, but it can get rid of the scratches and make your floors look good again!

 

Hope this helps you out,

aboveaveragejoe

 


Posted 2011-10-10T13:42:02+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL

I don't  think it can be fixed. When you have dogs I would go with a laminate floor. They hold up well. I also have dogs and that is what I used.

Posted 2011-10-09T14:48:45+0000  by gvw3
 
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