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Flooring

How to install lock and click bamboo flooring

This seems overwhelming to me but I cannot afford to have someone install the hardwood flooring for me so I have to tackle this project myself.  Quite a few questions:

 

1. I think there is hardy plank boards underneath the carpet, I need to confirm, if so, can I put this lock and click flooring on top?

 

2.  Will I need some type of padding for moisture?

 

3. Are there any video that will help me see how the install works?

 

4. What is a good brand that doesnt scratch up easily?

 

5. This is for rental property and I keep having to replace the carpet, is the wood flooring a good choice or should I go with ceramic tile flooring instead?

 

6. Do you have to glue anything with these lock and click floors??

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Posted 2010-11-08T15:27:10+0000  by sr98bj sr98bj
 

Hey arustgi,

 

I'd like to say welcome to the community and give you a big thanks!

It's always great to see other users on here picking up advice and information on older posts. Keep participating, we are all in this together to help out each other!

 

Have a great day

aboveaveragejoe

Posted 2010-11-29T20:38:00+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL

This is a very useful post. Keep up the good work homedepot!

Posted 2010-11-29T05:44:12+0000  by arustgi

Hey sr98bj,

 

     Welcome to the community! We're always glad to have new members and I'll be more than happy to answer your click-lock questions. I work as a Home Depot associate in the flooring department for almost 3 years now and one of the best things that I've seen in that time is the development of glueless hardwood flooring, more commonly called click-lock flooring. The great thing about click-lock flooring is the ease of installation versus hardwoods, and you get virtually the same look as hardwood! What makes click-lock easy to install is that it is installs exactly like laminate plank flooring. However, instead of being laminate pressboards, click-lock flooring is made of layers of real wood, be it bamboo or whatever wood you choose. The thickness and first appearance may look like laminate, but the integrity of click lock is far superior and just as good as solid hardwood. In other words, by using glueless planks,  the right tools, the right underlayment, and the click-lock you like, you can easily do the project yourself.

 

I'll break down this post by answering your questions in the way you asked them.

 

1. I think there is hardy plank boards underneath the carpet, I need to confirm, if so, can I put this lock and click flooring on top?

 

    Great question. If you have plank boards as your subfloor, you CAN put click-lock flooring on top, just as long as they are level, sturdy, and cleaned before placing your underlayment for your new flooring. After you pull up your old carpet, check the integrity of the subfloor itself to before committing to putting down the click lock.

 

2.  Will I need some type of padding for moisture?

 

    YES! Another awesome question, and one people don't consider when getting flooring.  Even with wood or higher level buildings where the subfloor doesn't get much moisture versus concrete subfloors, I always recommend using a high-quality underlayment with a moisture barrier, especially in your case since its for your rental property. The reason why is that even if your subfloor doesn't get any moisture from below the planks, its sure as anything to get moisture and spills from above the planks by way of your tenants everyday use of them. Of my favorite underlayments to place underneath that works great for the job and your wallet is an in-stock item that all Home Depot stores should carry. Its by Roberts and its called Harmony 3-in-1 underlayment. If you can't find the exact one, make sure to get something similar to it, the key feature being overlapping seams to provide the moisture barrier. Its more inexpensive that the special order cork underlayments we sell, and since its in-stock you can get your rooms done much quicker than waiting to get it shipped in. Here's a view of it,

 

underlayment.jpg

 

 

3. Are there any video that will help me see how the install works?

 

http://www6.homedepot.com/tv/hdtv_player.html?videoID=000083&cm_sp=dept-_-d23-_-KnowHow-_-Hardwoodtabs-_-videotag

 

     Other than using a more inexpensive underlayment, this is a great job they did on installing this, you'll notice the carpenter uses a 2x4 block for tapping in the planks, and a jamb saw to make the wood slide underneath the door jamb much easier. These are great reasons why you should always SEE the process instead of just explaining it in text.

 

4. What is a good brand that doesn't scratch up easily?

 

 

     While The Home Depot has a 1-5 scale regarding hardness in our stores, I do realize that there's many other places that sell click-lock flooring as well and they have their own scale. However, the flooring industry uses the Janka hardness test that is used for all species, makes, and models of flooring.  Use that as a point of reference when dealing with different sources of wood. It may take some internet researching if the boxes don't say the rating, but with The Home Depot's hardness scale, anything with a 3 or above should work just fine for your rental property. One of the hardest materials for hardwoods  that I can obtain for my customers is Brazilian Ipê. It has a very high rating on the Janka scale and is very durable. However, if one considers price and you are budget minded, then going with a species that isn't as hard will still work out great for you. Amazingly enough, most bamboos are not as highly rated as people think, but before you delve into your project,  always look carefully at the wood species you would like to put in.

 

5. This is for rental property and I keep having to replace the carpet, is the wood flooring a good choice or should I go with ceramic tile flooring instead?

 

   When owning rental property, really any hard surface (be it tile, hardwood, laminate) is really a better choice than having to replace carpet all the time. Ceramic tile is great for kitchen or bathroom areas, the most activity in the house, but it really comes down to personal preference when dealing with what exactly you want to put down. I prefer wood in living spaces and hallways, with tile in bathrooms. Contractors, carpenters, and DIYers  through experience and knowledge will tell you varying opinions on where to put what where. While my opinion goes on a case by case basis, I will say this: always weigh the pros and cons when dealing with your flooring. Ceramic or porcelain tile is great for those areas, but any sudden drops from say, a metal coffee cup  can dent or crack the tile. Replacement can be an issue, but on the other hand, with proper care it can last a lifetime. With wood floors,  the warmth and feel or real wood underfoot is better than cold tile in the morning, but there can be maintenance issues with hardwood. So really at the end of the day, decide on what is best for your budget and tastes. All hard surfaces that The Home Depot carries lasts very long and even with it being rental property. One of the biggest failures I've seen with wood flooring in high traffic areas is water or moisture getting into the planks. One suggestion is putting down 100% silicone caulking on the mouldings touching the flooring so as not to allow any water in. That tube of caulk can go a long ways in protecting not only your floor and subfloor, but prevents mildew and spores from growing due to moisture getting under your planks.

 

6. Do you have to glue anything with these lock and click floors??

 

  All click-lock floors that The Home Depot sells are entirely glue-free. I said earlier that click-locks are installed like laminate flooring, and the industry in the past few years have made great strides in making glue-free planks. Unless it says otherwise, the boxes you'll encounter at any home center that says click-lock flooring will be glue-free. The tongue and groove keep a tight seal on the planks and the moulding keeps the planks from bowing or coming up on your floor. It's a lot easier than the old way of doing it.

 

I hoped that has answered your questions regarding a great choice in wood flooring. Click-lock flooring is very easy to install, and I hope the video/picture/and my information has helped you out.

 

Have a great day!

aboveaveragejoe


 

Posted 2010-11-08T18:10:23+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL
 
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