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Installing Hardwood Floor over Concrete

I have always loved hardwood floors and would like to have one in my dining room.  I finally convinced my husband to install this, but I can't seem to find the information on how to install this over cement.  A list of products needed and a simple how to guide would be wonderful. 

We have installed slate, ceramic, a paver patio and a fence on our own, we have the time and inclination, I just want to do it right the first time.

Thanks for the help

Lynn

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Posted 2011-09-25T17:55:11+0000  by costellofam costellofam

You are quite welcome.

 

I find it a bit strange that the HOA calls for a sound deadening underlayment over a concrete subfloor; the properties of it are so dense that unless it is thin floors....almost any foot traffic below won't hear it.

 

If they are really sticklers for that kind of underlayment as you say, I'd opt for real wood click-lock flooring in lieu of glue down engineered flooring.

click-lock wood flooring

 

As the diagram shows, it installs just like laminate, except it is real wood. As long as you install it correctly over the sound deadening underlayment of your choice, you won't see any difference between it, engineered or even real wood solid hardwood flooring.

 

This is the only viable option (click-lock floating) I'd advise over an underlayment. If you chose to glue engineered planks directly to the underlayment, it could void the warranty, as the glue needs a solid/non-flexible surface to firmly attach to.

 

With that said, you can get a real wood floor, it just needs to be one that would be floating. It's actually easier to install it versus a glue down method and still looks just as good.  In fact, its hard to tell any floating or glue down wood floor once its installed correctly.

 

If you choose to glue any engineered flooring directly over an underlayment, and the manufacturer doesn't recommend it, you'll have more problems that what it is worth.

 

That's not to say it could work; but since there are so many brands and styles of engineered flooring, its best to research the floor first to make sure if it can or can't be done.

 

Let me know if you have any further questions,

Joseph

Posted 2014-01-25T17:58:35+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL

Thanks for the detailed response.

 

At a local home improvement store, I was recently able to compare a floating floor vs. a glue-down floor, by walking on each of their displays.

 

The floating floor sounded, and felt, hollow and 'clicky', while the glue-down felt solid and quiet.

 

Would gluing directly to concrete offer a quiet installation?

 

Thanks

Posted 2014-01-25T18:22:20+0000  by DrSpencer

No matter what type of flooring you want to use, always install it per the manufacturer's instructions.

 

This is exactly like the engineered floors vs. click-lock floating systems discussed earlier.

 

If you decide to glue a floating floor, just like engineered that wasn't rated for it, you'll be likely voiding your warranty and having tremendous issues further down the road...since that floor wasn't made to be adhered down.

 

I repeat DO NOT glue down a floor unless the manufacturer specifically states you can.

 

As for the hollow sounds underfoot of the click-lock, if you install it correctly and use high quality planks/underlayment, that 'clicky' sound shouldn't be experienced versus using more inferior products (thin planks/cheap underlayment).

 

Quarter round molding and transition pieces help lock in the planks, allowing it to float firmly over the underlayment/subfloor.

 

Let me know what flooring you decide to use, and I'm glad this information has assisted you.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

 

Posted 2014-01-25T18:36:16+0000  by Joseph_HD_ATL
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Posted 2017-02-28T05:58:41+0000  by amelia22brown
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