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Install & Replace

Priming and Painting Baseboard

I am replacing a 13 inch length of baseboard.  The replacement baseboard is smooth, unpainted, pine which I purchased from Home Depot.

 

My questions are as follows:

 

1)  Since the replacement baseboard is smooth pine do I have to prime before painting?

2)  If I must prime, should the primer be water or oil based?

3)  Should I sand the smooth pine?  If so, when should I sand?  Before painting?  Before priming?  After priming?

 

Thanks for your assistance!

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Posted 2013-01-22T19:37:25+0000  by lionnv lionnv
 

Hello Lionnv!

 

Priming is absolutely necessary on any unfinished wood.

 

Today, paint and primer products will meet that requirement ... or you can go old-school and use both primer and paint.

 

With the newer products which contain primer, sand before you begin.

 

With the old-school approach, prime, sand, re-prime and paint ... for the smoothest finish.

 

I like the oil-based primer on unfinished wood. It absorbs and seals the natural oils that wood often gives off.

 

If you take a piece of your old trim to The Paint Pit, your Paint Associate will color-match to make your project look just like the original.

Posted 2013-01-22T19:52:33+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

 

"I like the oil-based primer on unfinished wood. It absorbs and seals the natural oils that wood often gives off."

 

Pat and I are from the old school. Sometimes the old ways just work best! As good as the water soluble paints keep getting, there are still places where oil excells!

 

 An additional reason to use oil products on many types of woods and wood products is that,  lacking water, they do not raise the grain. Plywood and particleboard  are two which come to mind. A water based product raises the grain, an oil product sets it and, after a light sanding, the surface can be painted  smooth as glass.

 

Sometimes the grain raising of water can actually be used to one's advantage. For instance, if you are having a hard time getting wood to stain darkly enough, try wetting the surface, letting it dry down and then lightly sand the raised grain. It will then stain much darker than the virgin wood.

 

Posted 2013-01-23T01:54:40+0000  by ordjen
 
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