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Install & Replace

Toilet replaced guts

Still runs on and float is all the way up. Should I shorten the overflow tube?

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Posted 2011-03-06T16:00:41+0000  by pujolsmvp5 pujolsmvp5
 

Hi, and welcome to the community.

 

Some floats can be adjusted by tightening or loosening the arm. There is usually an adjustment screw where the arm is connected to the filler tube. Also, you could try bending the arm so that the ball level is lower. Be careful to only bend the metal part of the arm so that you don't risk breaking the connection.

 

toilet.jpg

Posted 2011-03-06T16:14:25+0000  by Kevin_HD_ATL

I have the plastic cylindrical float with the adjustment screw. I adjusted it down all the way. the water flow slows down but continues to run. Could it be a defective fill valve right out of the box?

Posted 2011-03-06T16:22:42+0000  by pujolsmvp5

Possibly...

 

Check to see if the valve seat might have a small leak. Sometimes there will be small cracks that allow a slow leak - resulting in a constant "catching up" of the water level.

Posted 2011-03-06T16:29:00+0000  by Kevin_HD_ATL

Hey pujolsmvp5, I think I can help you here.

 

Let me start with your first question:

 

“Still runs on and float is all the way up. Should I shorten the overflow tube?”

 

Shortening the tube will make tank water flow out of the tank sooner, which will make the valve run constantly as it tries to fill the tank to a higher level than the drain tube allows.  Your valve already runs constantly, so shortening the tube certainly won’t help.  Lengthening it might, but let’s assume the tube length is OK, and focus on the valve:

 

“I have the plastic cylindrical float with the adjustment screw. I adjusted it down all the way. the water flow slows down but continues to run. Could it be a defective fill valve right out of the box?”

FluidmasterValve.jpg

The easiest way to check for a defective valve:  With the water filling the tank, take your hand and gently pull the cylindrical float up to the top of its travel.  Regardless of the water level in the tank, that action will shut off the incoming water.  If it still comes in, the valve is bad.  If it stops, then either a simple adjustment is needed to fix it, or you have a flapper leak at the tank bottom.

Flapper.jpg

I assume that you replaced the flapper as part of the “guts”.  It’s a very common replacement item.

 

This leaves the valve adjustment.  The valve height is adjusted 2 ways.  The first involves turning the valve relative to its bottom stem in or out to lower/raise the entire assembly.  This is the first thing the instructions tell you to do to get the height close to right, since the adjustment range is quite large.  See the wide spiral screw threads on the stem of the valve that the light gray upper body mounts on?  Pull up the snap ring and turn the valve body while holding the base steady. You want to estimate how high the valve needs to be with the float all the way up.  As a rough guide, the water level should reach about halfway up the float, and you want that point to be about 1" below the overflow tube.  This is just a rough adjustment, since you will dial in the exact height you want next.

 

Last is that float adjustment screw.  This allows you to “fine tune” the float height so that the valve turns off when the water level reaches about 1” below the top of the overflow tube.  If you turn that screw adjuster back to about the mid-way position before you set the initial height mentioned above, you will have plenty of travel either way to get the water level just right.  Done!

 

I hope this helps,

Newf

Posted 2011-03-08T16:52:46+0000  by Chris_HD_CHI
 
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