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WOW! Faux Granite Countertops ... Savannah is at it again!

One of my regular customers, Savannah, has her DIY cap on!

 

Among her home renovation projects she made me stop and exclaim, “WOW! Faux Granite Countertops ... Savannah is at it again!”

 

Her granite-look faux countertops are an outstanding example of the vision she has for her home under renovation.

 

How lucky could we be? ... the recipients of her shared DIY skills.

 

Here are before and after photos of one countertop.

 

Countertop Before and After.jpg

 

Describing her process, Savannah said,

"Here is a before and after of one of my counters I have been faux painting to look like granite.

 

I sanded the old laminate counter with 220-grit paper and applied the Zinsser primer in grey.

 

Played all day with a sea sponge and this is what I have so far. I used...black, grey, brown, bronze, vintage gold, fawn, and white. It was mostly black, grey, and brown, and then went over the top with a mixture of fawn and vintage gold.

 

I also sprinkled extra fine light silver glitter at the end.

 

All that's left to do is seal it with epoxy. Thoughts before I seal?

Thanks,
Savannah”

 

Yes Savannah, I have thoughts!

 

I think you're a creative artist with enough confidence to imagine and attempt this great project, and really make it work!

 

You are what DIY is all about.

 

And best of all, you've taken time to share your work with The Community.

 

You're an inspiration!

 

Thanks, I can't wait to see what you do next!!!

 

HOW TO, STEP-BY-STEP:

1)      Use 220-grit sandpaper to buff sand the laminate counter top;

2)      Simply break the existing gloss on the surface and stop;

3)      Wipe the sanding dust off with a dry terry towel;

4)      Prime with Zinsser Cover Stain, tinted grey;

5)      Allow primer to dry at least two-hours;

6)      Use a small piece of heavily textured sea sponge (pinch extra valleys into sponge to create more texture);

7)      One color at a time, randomly sponge black, grey, and brown on as your base coat;

8)      Accent the random-color base coat with small dabs of fawn and vintage gold; and

9)      While the final colors are drying, sprinkle very small amounts of extra-fine light silver glitter.

 

After the entire surface dries about 48-hours, apply a water-based clear coat … like Varathane Semi-Gloss water-based polyurethane.

 

NOTE:

Because the paints are water-based, they will not properly accept oil-based clear coat. So make certain the “Clean Up” line on your product label says “water.”

 

FINALLY:

Remember that this is a craft project.

 

Take your time!

 

Allow each coat to dry before proceeding to next.

 

Colors blended too rapidly will tend to create muddy blurs.

 

As you prepare, take time to look carefully at a piece of natural stone … then let nature be your guide.

 

NOW IT IS YOUR TURN!

Show us your best DIY project ... share your "How To" projects and photos with The Community!

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Posted 2013-08-29T18:48:08+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL Pat_HD_ATL
I've said it more than once ... Savannah is so talented.

I spoke to her a few days ago at The Paint Pit and she is undertaking two new projects:

1) Applying a thin veil of gray stain onto untreated wood to create a weathered appearance; and

2) Creating a "Penny Floor."

The first project is underway ... she selected semi-transparent Harbor Gray stain and will work it into the wood as a base color.

And then, she'll most likely add secondary layers of this color as well as additional variations of gray to "age" the appearance.

The second project is presently an idea under development.

As Savannah said, "This area may require more than 100,000 pennies, so it will be some time in the future before we start."

Regardless of whether her projects are just ideas or a fully executed masterpiece, Savannah's creativity is an inspiration to everyone who loves DIY.
Posted 2014-06-26T16:55:33+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

Love the video Savannah!

 

Turning laminate butcher block counters into faux marble ... more beautiful with each revision!

 

I laughed when you said, "I look rich right now!"

 

Great DIY projects make us all "rich" because we upgrade our homes, save the cost of labor, and get the personal satisfaction of doing the work ourselves.

 

The two-part epoxy you used to create the "polished stone" appearance was a genius addition to your project!

 

At The Store, Parks Super Glaze is the same "ultra gloss epoxy" product.

 

The package looks like this and is located near the wood stains and polyurethanes in the Paint Department.

Parks Super Glaze.jpg

FINALLY:

Your instructions for thoroughly mixing equal parts of the epoxy to ensure the coating dries and using carbon dioxide to eliminate bubbles were both right on!

 

Every time I review your handiwork, I smile ... what an outstanding DIY project!

Posted 2013-12-31T14:29:38+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

It was great to see you yesterday Savannah!

 

Thanks for dropping the link to your video.

 

The steady stream of interest your project has created is a testament to your DIY skills.

 

Once again, it was great to see you and thanks for sharing your project with The Community!

 

Happy New Year!

Posted 2013-12-31T14:02:31+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXPXZOSWPqw&feature=youtube_gdata_player
Posted 2013-12-31T05:16:49+0000  by SavyD
Im Savannah Daisy! So glad my project gets others interested! Here is a link to my youtube video explaining what products I used and how I did it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXPXZOSWPqw&feature=youtube_gdata_player
Enjoy. Btw my counters are still shiny a beautiful...
Posted 2013-12-31T05:13:00+0000  by SavyD

Hello Bigg!

 

On walls, faux is most often executed over a satin or semi-gloss paint.

 

This allows the glaze to "slick around" and be manipulated.

 

Glaze will embed into a flat finish and cannot be easily worked.

 

KEEP IN MIND:

In this thread we also have questions about porous surfaces like cement and stone.

 

Many of these porous surfaces do not use a base coat ... stain or faux glaze is applied directly to these surfaces.

Posted 2013-09-17T16:08:36+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

Hello Churchmouse!

 

Outstanding idea!

 

Yes, you can faux those cement counters.

 

In fact, I instruct using the same technique on cement basement floors and outdoor cement patios.

 

Start by etching the surface with diluted muriatic acid ... take safety precautions to protect exposure to your skin and eyes.

 

Rinse thoroughly to flush any remnants of the acid ... a wet/dry shopvac would be a great help indoors.

 

Then randomly apply Behr Semi-Transparent Concrete Stain to create a mottled base coat.

 

Do not cover the entire surface with your base color ... random and irregular application would be your goal.

 

Allow the base coat to dry.

 

Use a somewhat darker second color to randomly fill many of the gaps in the base coat and allow it to dry.

 

Then use just a hint of an even darker third color to add splashes of color in only a few spots.

 

NOTE:

Take time to inspect your efforts often.

 

Like Savannah, your process may take the better part of a day or even several days.

 

FINALLY:

Once satisfied with the appearance, protect your handiwork with a water-based clear coat.

 

Or ... if you just want a simple even color on those cement counters, skip the faux and use two coats of your favorite color stain followed by the clear coat.

Posted 2013-09-17T15:42:11+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

Hello Paradise!

 

Savannah used Zinsser Cover Stain, tinted grey, as her base.

 

Then she fauxed Behr Ultra (half-pint sample) after blending it one-part paint and four-parts glaze.

 

She used small pieces of dimpled sea sponge as her applicator.

 

NOTE:

The surfaces Savannah fauxed are not in constant contact with water.

 

If you chose to faux surfaces that are in constant contact with water, you might choose an oil-based paint and faux glaze.

 

Oil-based protective clear coats, which will be much more durable, can be applied over these oil products.

 

FINALLY:

"Marine" is the designation for products that may be submersed or exposed to moisture for long periods of time.

 

The Home Depot sells only a few marine-grade products.

 

If you choose to faux your shower stall or lavatory, take time to research marine products.

Posted 2013-09-17T15:27:39+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

Thanks Danica77!

 

DIYers make these exact choices frequently.

 

Do I DIY or do I pay for renovation?

 

In many cases, DIYers save enough by doing the work themselves that they are able to complete other projects on their list.

 

I worked to help Savannah with this project, but this was just one of many projects on her whole-house renovation.

 

Her results were outstanding ... primarily because she took time to research the process and didn't rush through the execution.

 

I love DIY!

 

It's the core of what The Home Depot offers home owners ... "You Can Do It. We Can Help."

 

But, not every DIYer has the skill or confidence to complete every project.

 

Be selective!

 

Choose projects that match your skills.

 

And, consider contractors for those that are beyond your ability.

Posted 2013-09-17T15:19:24+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL

Hi steelbed89!

 

Absolutely!

 

Use this process on almost any surface ... particularly porous surfaces like faux marble.

 

Simply prep by sanding to eliminate the shine on the surface and then follow Savannah's recommendations.

 

When you complete your project, please come back and share photos!

Posted 2013-09-17T15:09:32+0000  by Pat_HD_ATL
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